Category Archives: Art

The day I gatecrashed Art

I didn’t mean to. Well, I did, but I wasn’t entirely sure it was Art. It was a group of innocent looking people standing around above the Turbine Hall in the Tate Modern. They weren’t talking to each other. They were just standing, on their phones or reading, leaning on the railings by the stairs. They could all have been just waiting for other people, but the smallest clue was that they were all facing the same way. There was no door or exhibition entrance or anything to queue for, but I’m British – I know a queue when I see one, so I went and joined it (at the back, obviously)!

Turns out, they were performers so I hope I didn’t offend anybody by joining in (apparently one of them gave me ‘a look’ as I walked away). I can’t have been the only one to do it, can I? Anyway, here’s why they were there:

Roman ondak – Good Feelings Good Times

gatecrashed-art

 

Advertisements

Dagenham Art is back

The Dagenham Art I wrote about last year is back with this new piece, called ‘Picnic’. The original post is below…

Dagenham-art-2016-1

 

DAGENHAM ART

Dagenham Art No.1. ‘Juxtaposition’ Aug’14

This piece is reflective of the local culture – the importance of brand labels in an area with limited incomes. The packages are vulnerable and open to the elements, yet sheltered by leafy pillars either side. Each bush has its own paper Primark bag to protect. The Nike box, however, is more exposed. Perhaps, by being stronger and well established, it can afford to exist without such protection. But with its confident orange shell, it draws our attention to the unassuming brown bags which may otherwise have gone unnoticed, thereby exposing them further.

And what of the contents. Is it simply the old and rejected in the discarded wrappings of the new or something more sinister? We’ll never know. This installation was on show for a limited period and is no longer available.

Dagenham-art-1

 

 

Dagenham Art No.2. ‘Anonymity’ Sep’14

These bags of gifts were left for the taking in early September. Despite claiming to be an anonymous piece, it’s all too brief appearance so early in the year doesn’t fool us. With that infamous red and white branding, this is clearly Santa’s work. We look forward to seeing more from him later in the year.

Dagenham-art-2


Dagenham Art No.3. ‘Black and Blue’. Dec ’14

This work has both sobriety and energy. There is something reassuring about the solid black bags sitting so heavily beneath the tree, yet the loose piece breaking free from the 3rd sack suggests drama and an insecurity in its desire to escape. The blue bag on the left juts out uncomfortably. It doesn’t seem to fit at all but despite being smaller than the black bags, demands our attention. Then what of the discarded tin to the right? It is so far removed from the rest of the work, one might wonder if it is even part of it. This is probably intentional and is, in fact, a clever distraction device, placed just far enough away to create discomfort as our attention is torn. This artist’s popularity is declining locally and critics have slated this piece as unimaginative and lazy, but is it simply misunderstood?

Dagenham-art-3

Sometimes we look but don’t see.

I hadn’t really been aware of street photography as a thing until I went to theprintspace’s September First Tuesday. The evening was a presentation by the Street Photography London collective. A talented bunch of photographers with different experiences and careers, who all share a love of capturing frames of interest they see on the streets.

I think I like it because its people watching, something I love to do. Everybody has a story to tell but in most cases, you don’t know what it is, so you make up your own stories about them. That’s what street photographers do – tell stories. It doesn’t matter if they’re true or not (or even if they’ve got people in).

All seven of the collective that presented had a good eye. Being in the right place at the right time isn’t enough. You look at some of the shots and think ‘ooh, that was lucky’ and maybe it was, but they had to be ‘seeing’ and be camera ready to catch it. It was an interesting evening and some good questions were asked (about permissions, equipment, process and morality) and some wise advice given (“Would you like it if it was taken of you? If not, don’t use it”).

There’s plenty of information out there about street photography so I’m not going to repeat it. I’d just like to share my favourite image from each of the seven photographers and leave you with a link to Street Photography London so you can find out more.

Nicholas Goodden - Walk the line - nicholasgooddenphotography.co.uk

Nicholas Goodden – Walk the line  Walk the line nicholasgooddenphotography.co.uk

Alan Schaller

Alan Schaller – alanschallerphotography.co.uk

Gagan-Sadana-TCR-rain

Gagan Sadana – blackandwhitestreetphotography.com

Justin-cliffe-threes

Justin Cliffe – justincliffe.com

Kin-Chan-colour-balloons

Kin Chan – kinchanphotography.com

Sam-Burton-birds

Sam Burton – samburtonphoto.com

walter-rothwell-disabled

Walter Rothwell – walterrothwell.com

Thank you, Nicholas Goodden
Alan Schaller
Gagan Sadana
Justin Cliffe
Kin Chan
Sam Burton and
Walter Rothwell

Black. And white.

This has nothing to do with dresses! davidbatchelorsign

This is about an exhibition we happened upon at The Whitechapel Gallery this weekend. It wasn’t the main exhibition (called Adventures of the Black Square which also sounds interesting) but the free exhibition alongside, called ‘Monochrome Archive, 1997-2015’. It’s by scottish artist, David Batchelor and is a series of photographs he calls ‘Found Monochromes’ – white (and black) blank spaces found in Cities he’s in. Watch the video of him talking about how it started and why (http://www.whitechapelgallery.org/exhibitions/david-batchelor/). I love this project – it’s an area that interests me – what is art and what isn’t. As he says, “…Is there a boundary between art and non art, or is it always negotiable? Is it always moving and a grey area? I think that’s an interesting place to be.”

If you’re near Aldgate in East London before the 3rd May (2015), do nip in and see it but if you can’t, here’s a link to the Whitechapel Gallery site and to David’s other work:

http://www.whitechapelgallery.org/

http://www.davidbatchelor.co.uk/

FoundMonochrome

Let there be light.

Have you heard of CreativeLive? They do brilliant online training courses in photography, marketing, software and even blogging.

Based in Seattle, they livestream creative classes around the world. You can watch for free if you’re online when the class is live – that’s usually from about 5pm to midnight here in the UK. If you can’t watch live, you can buy the classes as video downloads from as little as $29. You can get three days worth of expertise from $79. Seriously, it’s a bargain. These guys really know what they’re talking about.

I remember one of the first classes I watched was on Adobe Illustrator. I thought I knew it pretty well but, like when I go and freelance in an office with other people, there’s always more to learn. They often have different ways of working or cheeky little keyboard shortcuts I didn’t know.

This time, I’m excited to watch Ben Willmore’s Light Painting class. He takes photographs in the dark with long exposures and paints the light in where he wants it. It’s a beautiful effect. I really want to try it and I’m not even a photographer. I’d love to see what my friends who know their way around a camera could do. I’m going to have a go though and will report back in a future post.

BenWillmore-LightPainting

Created by Ben Willmore from DigitalMastery.com

DigitalMastery.com
https://www.creativelive.com/
https://www.creativelive.com/courses/light-painting-ben-willmore

Dagenham Art

Dagenham Art No.1. ‘Juxtaposition’ Aug’14

This piece is reflective of the local culture – the importance of brand labels in an area with limited incomes. The packages are vulnerable and open to the elements, yet sheltered by leafy pillars either side. Each bush has its own paper Primark bag to protect. The Nike box, however, is more exposed. Perhaps, by being stronger and well established, it can afford to exist without such protection. But with its confident orange shell, it draws our attention to the unassuming brown bags which may otherwise have gone unnoticed, thereby exposing them further.

And what of the contents. Is it simply the old and rejected in the discarded wrappings of the new or something more sinister? We’ll never know. This installation was on show for a limited period and is no longer available.

Dagenham-art-1


Dagenham Art No.2. ‘Anonymity’ Sep’14

These bags of gifts were left for the taking in early September. Despite claiming to be an anonymous piece, it’s all too brief appearance so early in the year doesn’t fool us. With that infamous red and white branding, this is clearly Santa’s work. We look forward to seeing more from him later in the year.

Dagenham-art-2


Dagenham Art No.3. ‘Black and Blue’. Dec ’14

This work has both sobriety and energy. There is something reassuring about the solid black bags sitting so heavily beneath the tree, yet the loose piece breaking free from the 3rd sack suggests drama and an insecurity in its desire to escape. The blue bag on the left juts out uncomfortably. It doesn’t seem to fit at all but despite being smaller than the black bags, demands our attention. Then what of the discarded tin to the right? It is so far removed from the rest of the work, one might wonder if it is even part of it. This is probably intentional and is, in fact, a clever distraction device, placed just far enough away to create discomfort as our attention is torn. This artist’s popularity is declining locally and critics have slated this piece as unimaginative and lazy, but is it simply misunderstood?

Dagenham-art-3


My clunkydoodle

It’s been on the wall for a few months now, my clunkydoodle. It’s called Robots and Bikers and I love it. I’d be interested to see one of those ‘Eye Tracker’ diagrams showing my eye journey. I’m sure there’s not a millimetre I haven’t scrutinised but I’m still finding new shapes I hadn’t noticed before.

Find out more about clunkydoodles via the links below.

my clunkydoodle on the wall.

my clunkydoodle on the wall.

http://clunkydoodles.com/

https://twitter.com/hashtag/clunkydoodles

http://www.thelondoneconomic.com/2014/06/04/clunkydoodles-made-in-clerkenwell/